Live better longer.

Working to create a world where everyone can have
healthy minds and healthy bodies at every age.

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A mission-driven community
of investigators

The Buck is a collective of the world’s top scientists in the field of aging who are sharing their methods and
expertise to find ways to help everyone lead fuller, healthier lives by ending age-related disease.

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Advancing the frontiers
of research on aging

Using cutting-edge science to tackle aging, the #1 risk factor for chronic disease.

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Our mission is to end the threat of age-related disease for this and future generations

We believe it is possible for people to enjoy their lives at 95 as much as they do at 25, and to achieve that, we’re seeking a more comprehensive understanding of the biology of aging itself.

Advancing the frontiers
of aging research

Using cutting-edge science to tackle aging, the #1 risk factor for chronic disease.

Buck celebrates 30 years of research on aging with major symposium

Leading scientists from across the nation gathered at the Buck on December 3rd to celebrate research on aging.

Intervening in glial cells protects neurons in Parkinson’s model

Buck researchers identify crosstalk between dopaminergic neurons and glial cells in fruit flies providing a potential new target for preventative treatment.

Running trails or genetic pathways: The future of exercise

What if you could receive the benefits of exercise moving only the muscles necessary to take a pill?

“What I want people to know about the Buck is the incredible commitment and excitement that permeates the walls of this institution. We are pushing the frontiers in an area that is going to impact all of humanity. I cannot tell you exactly when this will happen, but I can tell you big discoveries will come out of the Buck.”

Eric Verdin, MD, Buck Institute President and CEO

Intervening in glial cells protects neurons in Parkinson’s model

Buck researchers identify crosstalk between dopaminergic neurons and glial cells in fruit flies providing a potential new target for preventative treatment.

Exploiting a gene that protects against Alzheimer’s

Anyone who gets tested for their genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease likely knows about ApoE4.

Does dietary restriction protect against age-related leaky gut?

Buck Institute research shows that diet impacts the fitness of cells lining the intestinal tract. In flies, dietary restriction prevents leaky gut with aging, and a rich diet promotes it...
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Here’s what’s happening

Upcoming events that feature Buck science

Ongoing

The Conversation Continues: A Celebration of 30 Years of Research on Aging

Leaders in the field discuss the latest in research on aging.
Ongoing

Formal Research Seminars

Click “read more” for full schedule

Lifelong learning contributes to healthy aging!

6 week course on the Biology of Aging for a non-scientific audience

What happens in a brain impacted by #Alzheimer’s? A recent @CommsBio paper presents the largest-ever database describing changes in protein expression in different parts of Alzheimer’s-affected brains. #livebetterlonger https://t.co/rXiMn7uvU5

It's fun to work @BuckInstitute !! #livebetterlonger https://t.co/nxZwKGiDaZ

It's Day 1 of the West Coast SDB Regional Meeting at @CambriaPines. The meeting kicks off with a keynote address by Judith Campisi from @BuckInstitute. #WCSDB2019 https://t.co/8WkHqlZEyP

Active #brains tend to be healthy brains! Read our latest post about what kind of activities are good for brain health and learn how the Buck is getting involved in lifelong learning to help us all. #livebetterlonger https://t.co/AWkPh22Mfj

We're so happy to call Marin our healthy home! While there are still many important health disparities to address here and around the world, we hope our research will help close these gaps and allow everyone to #livebetterlonger. https://t.co/Ym87orN8Yl

Visit the
Buck Institute

Come and share in the excitement. Our doors are open, and we love talking about our science.

Join the fight against age-related diseases

You don’t have to be a scientist to make an important contribution to research on aging. We rely on donations to support the science that we believe will add years to people’s lifespan and decades to their healthspan.

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